• THIS WIDE NIGHT

    When the play begins, Marie is curled up in a leprous looking chair, in a cocoon posture I associate with people stranded overnight in airports or bus terminals, forced to sleep in unsympathetic surroundings….“It’s different, isn’t it?” Lorraine says, shortly after arriving at the slovenly one-room flat where Marie appears less to be residing than camping out….What’s most impressive about this production is that it conveys that ambiguity with such specific, palpable detail. It is to Ms. Pill’s and Ms. Falco’s great credit that they never seem entirely at home in the cramped, cluttered environment they share (designed with sociological exactitude by Rachel Hauck).

    Ben Brantley, New York Times
  • ORANGE, HAT AND GRACE

    Rachel Hauck’s imaginative set is breathtaking, specific, poetic, and Matt Frey’s perfectly delicate lighting design shimmers off black gloss walls.

    Huffington Post

    Rachel Hauck’s set, dominated by splintered wood and mulch, ingeniously evokes the eerie backwoods. Its sudden transformation from rooftop to cabin interior is a vivid bit of “rough magic” worthy of Prospero.

    NYTheater.com
  • CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF

    The Guthrie’s stage is no stranger to gorgeous set pieces, but Rachel Hauck’s set is exceptional in its beautiful evocation of such a strained interior space. Hauck manages to achieve both a deep sense of the room’s intimacy and the impression that there are vast tracks of land in the distance…This allows for the sense that the exterior pressures are constantly impinging on this interior space, and that events unfolding within have the utmost importance for the people and land without. The set’s duality highlights the drama’s preoccupation with the need for privacy and the impossibility of finding it.

    Aisle Say Twin Cities

    I’d also like to give a blogger shout out to Rachel Hauck… Kudos to Rachel!

    Taylor, Mind’s Canvas blog
  • GO BACK TO WHERE YOU ARE

    Thanks to Rachel Hauck’s understated scenic design, the sun-bleached grey wood of Claire’s deck and its row of Adirondack chairs blends with the looming, overcast horizon behind it—a perfect Montauk picture.

    nytheatre.com
  • PHAEDRA BACKWARDS

    Rachel Hauck’s set, a chaise longue and a dining room table with Chippendale chairs on an otherwise empty stage, is more than a study of minimalist luxury. The furniture actually seems lonely.

    New York Times
  • THE WINTER’S TALE

    Be that as it may, there’s nothing like a first-class set, and the loveliest one I saw in 2006 was created by Rachel Hauck for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s production of “The Winter’s Tale.”

    Wall Street Journal
  • A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM

    Sometimes a set makes a show, and Rachel Hauck, who designed the Pissarro-influenced production of “The Winter’s Tale” that I saw and loved at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival two seasons ago, has outdone herself this time around. Her décor is simple–a forest, a small platform, a window that seems to float in mid-air and a trapdoor that is put to ingenious use–but magical….

    Wall Street Journal
  • HOUSE OF BERNARDA ALBA

    Rachel Hauck’s set, a chaise longue and a dining room table with Chippendale chairs on an otherwise empty stage, is more than a study of minimalist luxury. The furniture actually seems lonely.

    New York Times
  • PALESTINE, NM

    TRachel Hauck’s scenic design and Alexander V. Nichols’ lighting and projection wizardry combine to invoke touches of Georgia O’Keeffe and Salvador Dalí. The effect intentionally leaves you flipping through mental atlases.

    Los Angeles Times

  • CAROL MULRONEY

    Rachel Hauck’s scenic design is simple yet eerily poignant and foreshadowing.

    New York Times
  • THE ROAD TO MECCA

    And also deserving special recognition is Rachel Hauck’s amazing set. The interior of the rough-and-tumble frontier home unfolds across the stage beneath the stunning panorama of South African sky, which soars away into the rafters projected across a massive cyclorama. Hauck’s set captures the sense of expansiveness and desolation that underlies Miss Helen’s character, and the dramatic power of the candlelight’s play across the glittering walls of the little house captures some of the sense of wonder the character sees in it. Of course, from experience the set is usually the one thing we have no complaint about at the Rep, but this one deserves special commendation.

    Seattlest
  • CREATURE

    Rachel Hauck make effective use of the Ohio Theatre’s deep, decaying-church-like space. The baby spends most of the play in a cradle suspended high above stage right, rocked via a pulley operated by the Nurse (a funny and touching Tricia Rodley). Characters enter from unexpected angles. Solid-looking tables and benches and an overall brownness evoke the deadly inflexibility of the ruling religious authorities. Candlelight and Theresa Squire’s rich, rough costumes create an effectively Medieval feeling.

    StageMage

    The scenes fly beautifully by…a tribute to Silverman’s assured direction and the almost hypnotic unity of Rachel Hauck’s austere wooden sets and Matt Frey’s soft-wattage candle lighting.

    Variety